A New Deal For South Sudan

As South Sudan marks the fourth anniversary since the declaration of independence on 9 July 2011, the country remains locked in a civil war that is estimated to have claimed more than 20,000 lives. Oil earnings have collapsed, and a succession of agreements sponsored by the Intergovernmental Authority for Development (IGAD) has failed to yield a unity government. But despite continued fighting, there have been developments in recent weeks that offer an outside chance of a political agreement.

In June, IGAD published the latest document setting out the terms for a ceasefire and the formation of a government of national unity. The ‘Agreement on the resolution of the conflict in the republic of South Sudan’ envisages a three-month transition period ahead of the formation of a unity government expected to rule for 30 months.


DON'T HAVE AN ACCOUNT?


NEED TO UPGRADE YOUR CURRENT SUBSCRIPTION?

By upgrading your Print or Digital subscription you will gain access to the MEES Archives Database with past articles and data dating back from 1984.

UPGRADE