A Tale Of Two Libyas As Jihadists Step Up Oil Field Attacks

Libya’s crude output has edged up to 400,000 b/d. But, while government-controlled eastern fields and ports are making progress, further west the situation looks dire: renewed Islamic State (IS)-linked oil field attacks have damaged facilities, and prompted NOC to declare force majeure.

Talks on the creation of a Libyan unity government resume in Algeria and Brussels in mid-March after a UN-brokered agreement. The previous round was suspended on 23 February when the internationally recognized government in Tobruk withdrew following a triple IS bomb attack that killed 45.

The UN, which also calls for an “immediate cessation of hostilities,” says the new talks will have three main aims: the formation of a government of national unity; the withdrawal of armed groups from towns and cities and other arms control measures; and a schedule to complete drafting of a constitution.


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