Sudan Economy Continues To Reel From Southern Amputation

Three years on from its split with South Sudan, Sudan’s economic prospects continue to be highly dependent on its neighbor to the south. The IMF urges subsidy cuts and diversifying the economy.

South Sudan marked its third anniversary of independence on 9 July. It was not a very happy one. Three years on, it has been wracked by civil war and little headway had been made on the many challenges of state building.

The fighting does not necessarily pose any direct security threat to Sudan – though the North continues to be affected by several simmering regional conflicts, of which that in Darfur is only the best known – but it has certainly had a destabilizing effect on its economy, which is still reeling from the loss of around three quarters of its oil production to the South when it seceded. Like the South, Sudan is heavily dependent on oil, and has been since the late 1990s.


DON'T HAVE AN ACCOUNT?


NEED TO UPGRADE YOUR CURRENT SUBSCRIPTION?

By upgrading your Print or Digital subscription you will gain access to the MEES Archives Database with past articles and data dating back from 1984.

UPGRADE